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Unregistered
Reply with quote  #616 
Wow!
My Mom has hallucinations due to Macular Degeneration and Glaucoma. It frustrates me at times as she says too many people are in her house. No one is there but her and I. Some days there is nothing. Evenings when it is dark she seems to see more of her hallucinations.

I have yelled that they are not real. She knows they are not real, but says they look so real.


I hope there will not be more always. It is almost a year and the Bonnet Syndrome should go away in 1 year or 18 months. I hope so!

I take care of me. I love my Mom! It is now I must keep myself healthier and know it is how it is with her.
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RM81
Reply with quote  #617 
This is an exact description of my 85 year old Grandmother, who i have recently moved in with to take care off as she was located a few minutes from my work.

How long did this last for? She was diagnosed with a chest infection, has been on anti biotics for 6 days and steroids for 3 (2 days left) Her infection seems to have cleared as her temperature is normal and cough that she had is almost gone.

But her hallucinations, talking to herself 24/7 is beyond control, she hasn't slept in 3 or 4 nights (Neither have I) And pretty soon sleep deprivation will start to take over.

Just hope it stops soon, otherwise i will be forced to look at alternative care for her.
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RM81
Reply with quote  #618 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phyllis

I cannot believe I'm reading this!!

 

My mother, who just turned 88, has been seeing animals, people, etc. for years. It used to be only at night, but now she sometimes sees them during the day. Last January, she has surgery and had a horrible reaction to the anesthesia. She halluciated wildly for several days but eventually got better.

 

Right now she is suffering from bronchitis and has been taking an antibiotic and cough syrup. The medicine is helping the bronchitis a lot, but she's seeing people and everything else. Last night she said smoke was coming out of the light fixture!! When I woke up this morning, I found both door standing wide open and lights on all over the house. She had her socks and shoes on and the walker out and was putting on a robe she hadn't used in years. This behavior was strange because, since she got sick, she has been dizzy and unbalanced and has barely been able to stand. I've almost thrown my back out several times trying to help her get situated in the bed. Now suddenly she's running around the house in the middle of the night and I don't even know it. Way too scary!!! When I asked her why the doors were open, she said "the people" who had been walking through the house all night had opened them and that she hadn't even been in the kitchen, much less opened the door.

 

I have explained this crazy behavior to numerous doctors. Most of them just shake their heads or ignore me. I finally found one who said he's seen this happen many times. That made me feel better.

 

My mother is perfectly sane and usually sharp. But when she gets this way, she gets confused and makes no sense whatsoever.

 

I am sooooooo happy to find this message board to see that I am not alone in this stuggle.



This is an exact description of my 85 year old Grandmother, who i have recently moved in with to take care off as she was located a few minutes from my work.

How long did this last for? She was diagnosed with a chest infection, has been on anti biotics for 6 days and steroids for 3 (2 days left) Her infection seems to have cleared as her temperature is normal and cough that she had is almost gone.

But her hallucinations, talking to herself 24/7 is beyond control, she hasn't slept in 3 or 4 nights (Neither have I) And pretty soon sleep deprivation will start to take over.

Just hope it stops soon, otherwise i will be forced to look at alternative care for her.
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Pauley
Reply with quote  #619 
My 90 year old mother has begin looking for my father, who passed away 27 years ago. She tells my brother, who stays with her, that he needs to listen for the phone because Garry (my other brother deceased for 32 years) might need a ride home and you will have to go get him because your dad won't feel like getting up to go after him"
Then the next night she went to the front door and out into the yard, to see if Daddy was coming home yet. She has mentioned both of them occasionally over the last week or so.
Does this mean she is close to dieing herself? Or could there be another reason for these episodes?
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Splothy
Reply with quote  #620 
My grandfather was like this shortly before he passed, but some people with dementia also exhibit behavior like this.  Dose she have Alzheimer's or dementia?   
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Splotchy
Reply with quote  #621 
That should read "does", not dose!
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Unregistered
Reply with quote  #622 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom
My mother is 88. She lives in her own home by herself and is about 85 miles away. I am an only child.

It has been my goal to keep her in this situation as long as she can care for herself. In general she does well. She fixes her own meals, takes her medications, and has good hygiene.

Her overall health is good. She does take medications for high blood pressure, arthritis, circulation, thyroid, heart, antacid, gout medication and elavil at night. Her hearing is not good and she does have macular degeneration which makes it very difficult for her to read.

While her memory fails her at times, she is alert and can carry on intelligent conversations. I call her every day and visit her once a week to take her shopping, to doctors appointments, etc.

Now for the problem:
Over the past 9 months or so, she has reported increasing incidence of hallucinatory episodes. At first, she tended to head music (opera usually) late at night. Then she started reporting seeing her sister (who passed 2 years ago) walking in the house late at night). Next, she heard people working on the house during the day -- no one was working on the house. More recently, she has made supper for my father (who passed 12 years ago) and made lunch for people she thought was working on the house.

We visited her physician, and he prescribed Namenda which she has been phasing into during the past 3 weeks. She is now complaining about feeling "out of it" for about 4 hours after taking the morning dosage. She has not reported any hallucinatory incidents -- until today.

Today she says that 2 of her neighbors and their daughter enter the house through a bedroom window, and that they were in the bedroom talking. She said that she actually say them and swears that they were there. She told them to get out of the house and not come back. She said that they then talked a little and then left (supposedly through the bedroom window). This was in late afternoon -- most of these incidents have occurred during daytime hours.

I am at wits end. When she relates these experiences to me either in person or on the phone, I can feel my blood pressure and heart rate increasing. I get very shaky (I already have tremors). I don't know what to do. She seems alright with the exception of these incidents. I know she is lonely but neighbors call her and stop in the see her. She refuses to have the TV or radio on during the day.

She could afford assisted living for only maybe 6 months. My wife wants her to move in with us, but, in the past, my wife has lacked patience for her after just 3-5 days. And I don't know if I could live with her either. Also, we already have my wife's father (who has Alzheimer’s) living with us (for 3 months now) and that is really straining our relationship.

My wife is retired but I have another 8 years to work a very demanding 60 hour per week job.

If anyone has any suggestions, thoughts or reactions, I would appreciate it.

Thank you.

Tom
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Unregistered
Reply with quote  #623 
Interesting to read all these descriptions of things that elderly folks are seeing. I'll refer to them as "things we don't see," but I'm not convinced they are hallucinations. My 87-year-old father lives in a memory care center and also sees things I don't see (children sleeping in his room at night for instance). Let's look at it a different way. Whose to say that what they see is real to them...that they have acquired the ability to see and experience things in a realm we have not yet entered. Perhaps this is our/their way of approaching death...that we will gain an ability to "visit" a different existence. My sister-in-law died at age 52 from colon cancer. She wasn't what anyone would call elderly but she also began to have visions before she passed. The day before she died she looked out her bedroom window and described seeing a man dressed in white sitting at her picnic table. No one else saw this but it was clear to her. I think it's worth considering that what our loved ones describe may not be true hallucinations; rather, they have gained an incredible ability to visit a realm we have not yet entered or can see. I have become more patient with my father when he describes his dreams and visions. I'd like to open my mind and have the ability to see what he sees, but I'm sure that will have to wait until I approach death.
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