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Heres an easy site to go to and it might be interesting to a few of us to try
 
 
 
 
 
http://www.knowitalz.com/chat/flashchat.php

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carol ann

How do we start a chat? 

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billie jo

jah, i checked this out. how does one get a user id and a password?

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To register go to http://www.knowitalz.com. Leave off the rest of the chat address and you'll see how to register.

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Sorry I goofed up the address, but I see Carol saved the day. I have been there, it is only 2 weeks old, so it will be slow at first, but it is a nice site as far as I can tell.

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Well, I got us registered, but when I clicked on Live Chat it said page not available. I guess it naps at times. But the site does have a lot of information and looks interesting. Thanks for sharing, JAH.

Carol
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I am bringing this back up, if you have problems with this site try it again, it is new but it is  mostly an alzheimers, dementia site. I found someone who has a similar situation to mine. It will be slow at first, but it is one on one and could be helpful to many of us. For the heck of it give it a try.

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Sherri
This note was posted to the website's home page today. Don't know how old it might be...

WEBSITE NOTE: WE ARE UPGRADING THE CHATROOM SOFTWARE.  PLEASE SIGN IN AND GIVE IT A TRY.  IF IT DOES NOT LET YOU SIGN IN, PLEASE ENTER AS A GUEST.  WE ARE TRYING TO MAKE IT EASIER FOR CAREGIVERS TO CHAT WITH ONE ANOTHER AND SHARE IDEAS, SO PLEASE EXCUSE THE INCONVENIENCE!  IF YOU CANNOT GET IN TO THE CHAT AT ALL, PLEASE EMAIL ME AT KATHY@KNOWITALZ.COM This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it - THANK YOU!

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JAH, thanks for bringing this thread to the top.  I know the Alzheimer's website is one I will be visiting often.  According to the staging on their website, my Mom is in Stage 5.  The subsequent stages are very grim.

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According to the stages, my mom would also be considered stage 5 although she's not been officially diagnosed as having alzheimer's. My dad developed stage 7 symptoms about two months before he passed away, but he was never officially diagnosed as having alzheimer's either.  They called it dementia - is it the same thing?  I guess I better go back and read more.  Thanks for posting the website.
Cathy

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Hi all,

I know the latest discussion in this thread is about the chatroom.  However, the thread was started by Cathy w/a C and and I don't know if anyone answered her question or not but thought I would try.  I may be way off from what has happened already but oh well.  Maybe she has already gotten the answer she wanted.  If that is the case then Cathy, and all others, please forgive me. 

Cathy asked if Alzheimers and Dementia are the same thing.  My answer is this.  My research has resulted in the following description.  "Dementia" is the disease, the cause can be one or more of the following.  It can be Alzheimer's, it can be Picks, Lupus or several other brain degenerating diseases.  Without specific testing it is hard to know what the cause is.  My wife has Dementia.  One doctor referred to it as "Early Onset Alzheimer's" another doctor referred to it as "Picks".  Both of these can effect a person at an early age.  My wife was 48 when the symptoms first started.  None of the doctors locally nor at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Az have performed any testing to conclude without question what has caused her Dementia.  They all agree it is Dementia with unknown origin and they all have their theories but no specific answer.  I have been told the only way to know for sure is to have a PET (Positron Emissions Transivity) done however, none will agree to doing it because it is expensive and the results won't prove anything different than the fact that she has Dementia.  Hence, I will always wonder what is causing her brain to die and what, if anything, in the past may have led to this situation.  After about 9 years she is totally bedridden and cannot do anything for herself and there are no sounds unless she is uncomfortable or there are loud noises, then she will scream out.  At this point she is just existing.  I have her at home because of other issues relating to others lack of concern for her care.

Sorry for butting in.  It seems I am always coming in at the end of everything and missed everything up front.  I saw the thread and noted that there were no responses relating to the original topic of discussion and thought I would add my 2 cents worth.  Again, I am sorry if I am just repeating what has already been discussed.

Billy G.
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Hi Billy G.  I'm so sorry that your wife developed this awful disease at such a young age. 

I appreciate your time and welcome any information and help.  It sounds like you have a lot of first hand experience with this, unfortunately. 

What I'm trying to figure out if it's possible, is how rapidly my mom's mental state will deteriorate.  She's 90, was always sharp mentally until the last couple of years,  in the last 6 months her mental state deteriorated rapidly, but now she seems to be holding her own.  Not sure if the decline goes in spurts, or will accelerate again at some point. Would the underlying cause of the dementia determine the rate of progression of the disease?

I feel like what I could really use is a crystal ball.  I'm trying to figure how to best plan for her care, and also to understand where she's at mentally. I can't tell if she's in or out of it a lot of the time.  On the phone she seems fine, but in person her mental decline is startingly obvious.

Thank you again for your time and information.  This is such a horrible disease to try to cope with for both the person afflicted and caregiver.

Cathy

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dsmyre
I went to this site and registered.  Then I clicked on Live Chat.  I got some sort of error message, so I will try again.

Thanks for the information.
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ACV
My mother is in mid-stage Alzheimer Disease. 
It presents differently in different people.  I was told that it can show gradual decline like stair steps---going down.  Or--it can plunge, and then plateau for awhile, until the next plunge.  No way to figure it, but it's terrible whichever way it progresses.
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This site is relatively new and had some updates and tweaking to do on thie chat room, i am told it will be running better shortly. Don't give up on it, try it, I have and found it a very supportive place.





http://www.knowitalz.com/
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